Arthur Balfour’s Ghosts

£14.95

An Edwardian Elite and the Riddle of the Cross-Correspondence Automatic Writings

Trevor Hamilton

This book tells the incredible story of the cross-correspondence automatic writings, described by one leading scholar of the field, Alan Gauld, ‘as undoubtedly the most extensive, the most complex and the most puzzling of all ostensible attempts by deceased persons to manifest purpose…’

Paperback 300 pages

9781845409135

£14.95

 

 

Free shipping to UK

Description

This book tells the incredible story of the cross-correspondence automatic writings, described by one leading scholar of the field, Alan Gauld, ‘as undoubtedly the most extensive, the most complex and the most puzzling of all ostensible attempts by deceased persons to manifest purpose, and in so doing to fulfil their overriding purpose of proving their survival’. It is an intensely personal and passionate story on so many levels: May Lyttelton trying to convince her lover Arthur Balfour of her continued existence; Myers with indomitable persistence trying to produce evidence to prove survival generally; Gurney and Francis Balfour striving from beyond the grave to influence the birth of children who would work for world peace; Gerald Balfour and his lover Winifred Coombe-Tennant believing that their child, Henry, would be the Messianic leader of this group of children.

3 reviews for Arthur Balfour’s Ghosts

  1. 5 out of 5

    “This book is a sympathetic, exhaustively researched and well documented study of the famous ‘cross-correspondences’ found in the automatic writings of distinguished SPR members and one professional medium…”

  2. 5 out of 5

    “Arthur Balfour’s Ghosts is the most important book on a topic in psychical research published during 2017 and the most significant book on the evidential aspects of mediumistic communications to have appeared for several years… “

  3. 5 out of 5

    “Arthur Balfour’s Ghosts – An Edwardian Elite and the Riddle of the Cross-Correspondence Automatic Writings makes for surprisingly open and communicative reading. Given the potential complexity of the actual subject matter itself… these 279 pages inadvertently allure the reader into wanting to read more.”

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