Science and Consciousness Just Wed — Should this Union Be Annulled?

Jonathan Bricklin The union of Science and Consciousness was recently celebrated in Tucson. After 11 biennial sessions as ‘Toward a Science of Con­sciousness’, the premier conference fostering their relationship has dropped the tentative ‘toward’. Congratulations to ‘The Science of Consciousness’. But why the long engagement? And how compatible are they really? The scientific study of consciousness was all the rage …

Table of Contents – JCS Vol. 23, No. 9-10, September/October 2016

Journal of Consciousness Studies controversies in science & the humanities 4      About Authors Refereed Papers 7      The Evolutionary Origins of Consciousness: Suggesting a Transition Marker                                                                        Zohar Z. Bronfman, Simona Ginsburg & Eva Jablonka 35      Conscious vs. Unconscious: In Defence of the Former                  Rowdy Bryant 50      ‘What it is Like’ Talk is not Technical Talk                                      Jonathan Farrell 66      Attention and Aesthetic Experience                                                  Peter …

New book: What is Wrong With Us?

What is Wrong with Us? Essays in Cultural Pathology Editors: Eric Coombes and Theodore Dalrymple Can any of us entirely banish from our hearts and minds grave misgivings about the condition of the culture we now inhabit? Expressions of those misgivings are mostly unheard in public forums, ignored in the dominant media, and, if noticed at all, dismissed by state-supported …

A Riddle Written on the Brain

Nicholas Humphrey   Abstract: The sensation of red light falling on your eyes has some­thing in common with the experience of looking at a cartoon in the New Yorker. The phenomenal quality of the sensation and the funni­ness of the joke are both properties of your subjective take on an external event and both arise in two steps. With sensations, …

writing a book review for JCS

Any readers interested in writing a book review for JCS please contact the book reviews editor, Jonathan Edwards, on jo.edwards@ucl.ac.uk with your suggested book title to review and for further details and information as to how to proceed. Alternatively, if you have already completed your review please email it to him for consideration. Many thanks.

JCS Vol. 23, No. 7-8, July/August 2016 Editorial Introduction

Mattia Riccardi and Frank Larøi   It is far less uncommon than usually thought that our mind (or brain) makes us seem to see, hear, touch, smell, or taste certain things despite none of such things being there in our surroundings. When this happens, we undergo an hallucination. States of mind of this kind can be extremely disturbing as well …

Table of Contents – JCS Vol. 23, No. 7-8, July/August 2016

  Journal of Consciousness Studies controversies in science & the humanities   Hallucinations Special Issue edited by Mattia Riccardi and Frank Larøi 4      About Authors 9      Editorial Introduction                                             Mattia Riccardi                                                                                                     & Frank Larøi 23      Perceptual Acquaintance and the Seeming Relationality of Hallucinations            Fabian Dorsch 65      Hallucination as Mental Imagery                             Bence Nanay 82      Toward a Unified Account of Hallucinations        Jérôme Dokic …

Ranulph Glanville and How to Live the Cybernetics of Unknowing

A festschrift issue of Cybernetics and Human Knowing focusing on the work of Ranulph Glanville, cybernetician, design researcher, theorist, educator and multi-platform artist/designer/performer. Available now from our bookshop: just click on the image. Enter coupon code glanville for 25% off published price. Cheaper than Amazon! £19.95  £14.95  Free postage for UK orders  

The sensorimotor approach – consciousness as a red herring

I particularly enjoyed J. Kevin O’Regan’s no-nonsense account of the sensorimotor approach to consciousness. He, indeed, may be right that consciousness is a multivariate phenomenon with many parallel streams which does not emerge from the brain as a discreet identifiable process, and is consequently unclassifiable. I can almost subscribe to this view, but it still leaves many scientific avenues open …